Common Gardening Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

It is good to have a positive attitude when you garden, but you need to also focus on what needs to be accomplished. If you start the garden remember this - certain mistakes must always be avoided in order to have success. As a rule of thumb, always be prepared for the worst. If you're not sure where the best place to plant something is, how much water it needs, how much space and other factors, make sure you find out.

If you plant your garden at a time that isn't ideal, your plants can become stunted and not thrive. Regardless of whether you are planting directly into the ground with seeds or are setting out bedding plants, you don't want to make the mistake a lot of new gardeners make by planting too early in the season.

You may be enjoying the nice spring-like weather, but don't take it for granted that a late frost won't occur. If you plant your garden too early, winter can fool you and produce a couple more killer frosts that will damage or kill your plants. If you just give it a little more time - until all danger of freezing weather is past - your garden will get off to a healthy start.

One major headache for gardeners are pests. There are large pests and small pests, but they all cause problems. Pesticides are very effective for dealing with small insects and different diseases that afflict your plants. Make sure you follow the recommendations on the pesticide you use because if you use too much, some of your plants will suffer. You also want to be careful that you don't kill the insects that help your garden. These can include the ladybug, the dragonfly, and the bee. If you want to plant according to organic principles, you'll have to rely on natural methods of pest control, such as garlic, mineral oils and soaps.

You will find that bigger animals will invade your garden with an eye to chewing on the plants or eating the ripening vegetables. Depending on where you live, you may have skunks, squirrels, rabbits, and deer to contend with. You also have to keep an eye on your pets because they love to attack the plants and wallow in the warm earth of your garden. In reality, the best solution for all the larger pests - wild animals and household pets - is to enclose your garden in a sturdy fence.

{Many amateur gardeners forget to acknowledge the location in which they reside and whether or not the plant they like the taste of or love the looks of will really be able to grow in their location. You may marvel at the notion of eating avocados and oranges from your very own trees, although if you live in a nether region, this just will not work. The same is true for making attempts of growing cacti or tropical plants in northern locations. Building a hothouse is one technique for doing this, although if you are a new gardener and do not want to put a bunch of efforts into it, select plants that can do well in your area. If you are getting your seeds in the US, you can read about the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone, which gives you a clear understanding of what plants grow easily and in which zones.|Most plants need sunlight, but the specific requirements of different plants varies considerably. The time to figure out how much sun your plants need is before you start your garden. Six hours is the general rule for most vegetables though it may vary. official statement The amount of sunlight that your garden area will receive needs to be considered before planting any vegetable. If you don't have much sun, look for plants that thrive in the shade. You also have to be careful about overexposing plants to the sun. If you have reflected light, this might be more beneficial for some of your plants opposed to direct light from the sun overhead.|Make sure you learn about plants that can grow fast and spread - thus strangling your other plants. These plants can really hamper the production of other plants. Ordinary plants, such as mint, can quickly spread through their root systems and crowd out other plants in your garden.

Horseradish is one such plant that, once it takes hold in your garden, will be hard to get rid of. Check your seed catalog - if you use one - and you will find that the plants that are invasive are classified as such as a warning to unwary gardeners. If you're fond of a certain next invasive plant, the best solution is to plant it in a container so it doesn't pose a threat to its neighbors.|Using poor quality soil is a gardening mistake that can spell doom for your garden before you even get started. The health of your garden depends on the health of the soil you use. Do a test on the pH of your soil before you even begin planting. This will tell you if your soil is alkaline or acid. {You can purchase kits to test your soil at any gardening center or online.|

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